Zones

Zones of the North Eastern States

Click images for larger views.

United States   
The latest version of the USDA Zone Map was jointly developed by USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Oregon State University’s (OSU) PRISM Climate Group, and released in January of 2012. To help develop the new map, USDA and OSU requested that horticultural and climatic experts review the zones in their geographic area, and trial versions of the new map were revised based on their expert input.
Most of the larger countries of the world have their own version of a hardiness map. Australia, New Zealand, Africa, Canada, China, Japan, Europe, Russia, South America, and many more have a similar system, although many have naturally warmer zones and the zones may get higher than the USDA system – where 11 is the highest. Countries such as Africa, New Zealand and Australia are examples of places where the hardiness zones will go off the USDA chart. Britain and Ireland are also countries where the winters are milder than many of the northern U.S. states. Therefore, their hardiness zone map will range from 7 to 10. Northern Europe has colder winters and falls between 2 and 7…and so on and so on.
Connecticut  
Now that you know your Connecticut hardiness zone, you can better understand what plants will do well in your garden. You can use plants in your garden that are your growing zone or lower. So, if your zone is 6, you can plant plants that are suitable for zones 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. You local nursery will carry many beautiful plants that are appropriate for your USDA Connecticut planting zone. The plants will be clearly marked with the zone that they belong to. You can buy these plants and know that they will not die over the winter due to the temperature. If you would like to grow something that is not appropriate for your zone, you will need to protect that plant from the weather.
Delaware  
To learn your zone, locate the area you live in on the Delaware zone map for hardiness. Match the area’s color to the legend on the right. The color on the legend will show you what the zone you live in is.

When you know the plant growing zones in Delaware that apply to you, you will be able to plant a garden that will survive the winter and return, year after year, to give you pleasure and enjoyment. Whether you are ordering online or shopping at your local nursery, you will find that most plants will be marked with their appropriate planting zone. You can plant and grow anything that is in your zone or lower. So, for example, if you live in zone 7, you can plant anything in zones 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 or 1 and know that they will be able to survive where you live. Anything in a higher zone will need extra steps taken to protect it from the winter cold.

Maine  
The USDA had found that previously identified hardiness zones in Maine had shifted. This map shows where the new growing zones in Maine are.

Understanding what USDA Maine planting zone you live in is important to how well your garden will do. Knowing your zone allows you to choose plants that will survive the winter. If you try to grow plants that are not appropriate to your zone, the plants you grow will die. Plants that are appropriate ones for the Maine hardiness zone you live in can be found at your local plant nurseries or stores. The perennials they carry will be clearly marked with the zone that they are suitable for. You can plant any perennial that is marked for your growing zone or lower.

Maryland  
The Maryland plant map includes zones 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a, 7b, and 8a. The easiest way to use the map is to click on the above map, enlarge it, and find your general area. Both novice and experienced gardeners benefit from the information provided in the USDA plant hardiness map. The majority of nurseries and plant distributors use USDA zone information on their plant labels. If your Maryland zone is included on the label, you can be confident that the plant will survive the winter in your area, assuming that you follow planting and care instructions specific to the particular plant.
Massachusetts  
The Massachusetts planting map includes zones 5a, 6a, 6b, 7a and 7b. To see a closer image of the zones, you can click on the map above. Once you find your location on the map, you can use this information to find the best plants suited for your Massachusetts zone.

It is important to note that the USDA plant hardiness map is useful as a foundational tool when choosing plants. Other factors do affect the vitality of plants in a certain area. These factors include, wind, soil, humidity, winter sunlight, pollution and how you plant and care for plants. The USDA plant hardiness map is used by most nurseries and is noted on the plant label. If you do not see the hardiness zones indicated, be sure to ask someone at the nursery who can provide that information for you. Most local nurseries will sell only plants that will survive in the area in which they are located.

New Jersey  
   If you live in New Jersey and you want your garden to be a success, you need to know the growing zone that covers your region. The map above is the New Jersey planting map, which the USDA released for 2012. New Jersey is divided into four different planting zones, 6a, 6b, 7a and 7b. Click on the map to enlarge it to determine which zone you are in.

In addition to new winter low temperatures, the USDA plant hardiness map now takes into consideration the closeness to a large body of water, elevation and the urban heat effect.
Zone information should serve as a guide, so gardeners need to understand that failure to follow planting and care instructions can cause extensive damage, and even death, to a flower, shrub or tree. When shopping for plants for your region, visit your local greenhouses or plant distributors who will carry plants best suited for your USDA planting zone.

New Hampshire  
New Hampshire can have cold winters, down to -35 F. in some parts. The New Hampshire USDA planting map divides this northerly state into six zones: 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b and 6a.

While the majority of the New Hampshire planting zones experience extremely cold winters with a chilly lows, many flowers, shrubs and trees can survive and thrive in this climate. It is always best to choose native species that are well adapted to specific growing regions and weather extremes. While the USDA New Hampshire zone map sets the standard for winter hardiness, it is not fool proof. Failing to properly plant or care for a flower, tree or shrub or a freak weather occurrence, such as uncommonly cold or warm temperatures, can injure or kill plants. Use the New Hampshire planting map as a guide but always be aware of other variables.

 New York  
According to the USDA map, New York zones include a wide range from 3a to 7b. Those living in zone 3a will not necessarily be able to grow the same plants that can be grown in 7b. Elevation and proximity to large bodies of water play a role in the winter extreme low temperature variance seen on the map. Although the new USDA plant hardiness map is more sophisticated than previous versions, it is still not a guarantee. Gardeners should be aware that there are other factors that influence plant hardiness including how and where the plant is placed in the landscape and how it is cared for. Use the data provided by the hardiness map as a foundation when choosing plants and be sure to do your research before incorporating any flower, shrub or tree into your landscape.
 Pennsylvania  
  Pennsylvania zones include 5a, 5b, 6a, 6b, 7a and a very small section of 7b. If you have a difficult time finding your location on the above map, you can visit the USDA site where you can input your zip code to find out exactly which zone you are in. The Pennsylvania plant map serves as an extremely useful tool and is a good starting point when choosing plants. Many local nurseries will carry plants that are suitable for your particular growing region. Always follow planting and care instructions carefully to ensure the best results.
Rhode Island  
This is the USDA Rhode Island planting zone map. You can look at this map to learn the Rhode Island climate zones and which one you live in. In order to find your USDA planting zone, simply look at the map and locate where you live. Then, match the color of that location to the legend to the right. 

It is important to note that the USDA plant hardiness map is useful as a foundational tool when choosing plants. Other factors do affect the vitality of plants in a certain area. These factors include, wind, soil, humidity, winter sunlight, pollution and how you plant and care for plants. The USDA plant hardiness map is used by most nurseries and is noted on the plant label. If you do not see the hardiness zones indicated, be sure to ask someone at the nursery who can provide that information for you. Most local nurseries will sell only plants that will survive in the area in which they are located.

Vermont  
Vermont zones include a small pocket of 3b with the central section of the state being zone 4a and the southern section 4b. There are a few pockets of 5a in the very southerly parts of the state. Much of Vermont has a very short growing season and some cold average extreme winter lows that dip to -35 F. While many plants, shrubs, and trees will survive and are adapted to this type of extreme weather, it is important to choose only those that are listed for your zone. Although the Vermont USDA planting map is an excellent resource for gardeners, it cannot replace proper planting and care that are essential in order for plants to thrive.
   

 

For more information Plant Hardiness Zones, follow this link: http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/